Monday, October 20, 2014

Visitors – What Are Your Post Show Plans?

My last blog suggested to trade show visitors that they should have a pre-show plan on what booths they want to visit and prepare a walking schedule in advance. Well, what about a post-show plan? What do you do with all the information you have when you return. You might want to take some time to write up a synopsis of each booth of interest you visited and what you learned at that booth. Try to do this as soon as you can upon returning to work after the show. A few weeks later and you won’t remember as much.

You will be grateful later on that you have the written reference material to remind you of what companies you visited and what they had to offer that was of interest to you. You can put it in a 3-ring binder and add pocket pages to hold the flyers and printed material you picked up at the show. Don’t wait for the exhibitors to contact you if you are in need of information in a hurry for an upcoming project. They may have hundreds of visitors to contact and may not get to you right away. Get the most out of your visit to the trade show by planning ahead and following up on your return.

The author, Marge Bonura, is the Director of Sales & Marketing for New England Machinery, Inc. (NEM). NEM is a leading packaging machinery manufacturer of bottle unscramblers, cappers, orienters, retorquers, lidders, pluggers, pump sorter/placers, scoop feeders, hopper elevators and much more. The company has been in business since 1974 selling to the food, beverage, pharmaceutical, personal care, chemical, household products, automotive and other industries. For more information on NEM, visit their website at www.neminc.com.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Visitors To Trade Shows - Do You Have a Show Plan?

To those who plan to visit the upcoming Pack Expo International and Pharma Expo to be held at McCormick Place in Chicago November 2 – 5 this year, I am asking if you have a plan in place? As a visitor you may think this is a strange question. In reality it’s really an important one. Most attendees are there for a reason. They are going to the show in the hopes of finding new technology or an answer to a need at their production plant. But if they arrive at the show without pre-planning their visit, they may be wasting valuable time and resources.

If you seriously need to learn about new technologies and machinery, do a little research prior to leaving for the show. Use the internet or packaging machinery magazines, to find out who will be there and what machines and new technologies they will be exhibiting. Then find their booth number and make a notation of it. Once you have a list of everyone who advertised to have what you want to see, plot out your walking strategy to make sure you can stop by those important booths. It is easy to become distracted at shows and spend a lot of time looking at something that is interesting, but isn’t the reason you are there. Make your trip to the show pay off with the results you need and your management expects.

The author, Marge Bonura, is the Director of Sales & Marketing for New England Machinery, Inc. (NEM). NEM is a leading packaging machinery manufacturer of bottle unscramblers, cappers, orienters, retorquers, lidders, pluggers, pump sorter/placers, scoop feeders, hopper elevators and much more. The company has been in business since 1974 selling to the food, beverage, pharmaceutical, personal care, chemical, household products, automotive and other industries. For more information on NEM, visit their website at www.neminc.com.

Monday, October 13, 2014

Plan Ahead – It Does Make a Difference

Most people say they are too busy today to plan for tomorrow. In business this could be a critical mistake. Be aware that your best competitors may not make that same mistake and you may one day wonder how they got so far ahead of you. Planning ahead takes discipline, time and effort. It requires deep thought into what your want to happen and the steps you need to take now to make sure that takes place.

Planning requires specific targets be set, with milestone dates pre-determined to track the progress of the plan. The plan must be flexible and adjust to unforeseen roadblocks that require a deviation in the course.

A well thought out plan can increase your sales, improve your operating efficiencies, cut costs, or take your company to the next level. It’s up to you where you want to go with your company, but without a good plan that is well administered, it will never happen. You will just keep talking about where you want to go and wondering why you just can’t seem to get there.

The author, Marge Bonura, is the Director of Sales & Marketing for New England Machinery, Inc. (NEM). NEM is a leading packaging machinery manufacturer of bottle unscramblers, cappers, orienters, retorquers, lidders, pluggers, pump sorter/placers, scoop feeders, hopper elevators and much more. The company has been in business since 1974 selling to the food, beverage, pharmaceutical, personal care, chemical, household products, automotive and other industries. For more information on NEM, visit their website at www.neminc.com.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

What Isn’t Measured Doesn’t Happen

If your organization is having difficulties in accomplishing goals, it may be due to the fact that the tasks required to reach those goals are not being measured. For example, if you want to increase your sales by 10%, what tasks need to take place to make that happen? Will it require a 10% increase in sales calls, or a 10% increase in quotes? Whatever steps are necessary, must be documented and measured. This is then communicated to the individuals who perform the tasks and they should ‘buy in’ to the change in requirements.

This is where it is important not to ‘drop the ball’. Follow through on measuring the increase in tasks. Are they really increasing the amount of calls? How is this being measured? Are the individuals accountable for performing the required tasks? If management does not take the time to measure and discuss the results with the persons responsible for performing the tasks, then nothing will change and your goals will not be met. Just remember, ‘what isn’t measured, doesn’t happen.’

The author, Marge Bonura, is the Director of Sales & Marketing for New England Machinery, Inc. (NEM). NEM is a leading packaging machinery manufacturer of bottle unscramblers, cappers, orienters, retorquers, lidders, pluggers, pump sorter/placers, scoop feeders, hopper elevators and much more. The company has been in business since 1974 selling to the food, beverage, pharmaceutical, personal care, chemical, household products, automotive and other industries. For more information on NEM, visit their website at www.neminc.com.

Monday, October 6, 2014

Is Your Business a ‘Professional’ Organization?

Does your company project a professional persona? Would individuals who deal with your company (i.e. customers, vendors) describe it as a professional company? Professionalism in business is not restricted to law firms, banks and investment firms. It should describe every business organization.

Your company does not have to be large or sophisticated to be professional. A ‘professional’ organization treats everyone with respect, honesty and integrity. It deals with everyone in the same manner regardless of whether they are a vendor, a customer, or a service provider. Professionalism is more a manner of dealing with business associates and situations than it is a designation due to what you are selling. A business can be professional whether it sells goods, offers services, provides health care, builds and sells products like packaging machinery, or any other means of conducting business.

Professionalism should be a part of every company’s standard practices and Mission Statement. The bottom line is that if every employee follows the ‘Golden Rule’ and treats others the way they want to be treated, the company will be a ‘Professional Organization’.

The author, Marge Bonura, is the Director of Sales & Marketing for New England Machinery, Inc. (NEM). NEM is a leading packaging machinery manufacturer of bottle unscramblers, cappers, orienters, retorquers, lidders, pluggers, pump sorter/placers, scoop feeders, hopper elevators and much more. The company has been in business since 1974 selling to the food, beverage, pharmaceutical, personal care, chemical, household products, automotive and other industries. For more information on NEM, visit their website at www.neminc.com.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

The Importance of Saying ‘Thank You’ in Business

When you receive a gift or someone does something nice for you in your personal life, you thank them. A formal written thank you is the overall best method to acknowledge your appreciation, but a phone call, e-mail or face to face communication of thanks is also acceptable.

In our business lives, we often take for granted that when someone helps us with a project or gives us information we need to get our job done, it is all part of their job to do so. Assuming that the other individual is being paid to ‘do their job’ and that they don’t need to be thanked for it, is a wrong impression.

We all like to know that our efforts are appreciated by those around us. Job satisfaction goes way beyond the simple receipt of a paycheck. As a matter of fact, statistics show that most people consider a paycheck as low on their list of what motivates them to do their jobs. Recognition by others is very high up on that list. So the next time someone helps you in any way, don’t forget to thank them. If they continually assist you, day after day, a written communication explaining your gratitude for their help goes a long way to making their day better and keeping them motivated to continually support you.

The author, Marge Bonura, is the Director of Sales & Marketing for New England Machinery, Inc. (NEM). NEM is a leading packaging machinery manufacturer of bottle unscramblers, cappers, orienters, retorquers, lidders, pluggers, pump sorter/placers, scoop feeders, hopper elevators and much more. The company has been in business since 1974 selling to the food, beverage, pharmaceutical, personal care, chemical, household products, automotive and other industries. For more information on NEM, visit their website at www.neminc.com.

Monday, September 29, 2014

NEM’s 2015 Trade Show Schedule

New England Machinery, Inc. (NEM) is planning a busy 2015 trade show schedule. We will start off the year at the all new Pack Expo East 2015 to be held February 16-18 in Philadelphia, PA. NEM will be located in booth 925 at that show.

In June, we will be at the Expo Pack Mexico Show from the 16-19 at Centro Banamex in Mexico City. NEM’s booth is located in the PMMI pavilion in #2320.

September you will find us at the Pack Expo Las Vegas 2015 show held at the Las Vegas Convention Center. The show will run from September 28-30. NEM will be located in booth C-3800.

Simultaneously running from Sept. 28-30 at the Las Vegas Convention Center will be the Pharma Expo 2015 show. NEM will be located at that show in booth N-304.

We are excited to be exhibiting at these great shows in 2015. Make sure to stop by our booth if you are attending any or all of these shows. We love to see everyone and just say ‘Hi’ even if you are not looking for machinery.

The author, Marge Bonura, is the Director of Sales & Marketing for New England Machinery, Inc. (NEM). NEM is a leading packaging machinery manufacturer of bottle unscramblers, cappers, orienters, retorquers, lidders, pluggers, pump sorter/placers, scoop feeders, hopper elevators and much more. The company has been in business since 1974 selling to the food, beverage, pharmaceutical, personal care, chemical, household products, automotive and other industries. For more information on NEM, visit their website at www.neminc.com.